Lobestir Special Guest Edition: Clark B.

posted by Gina 

Join me in conversation with Clark B., comic book expert and avid reader.

clark

Continue reading “Lobestir Special Guest Edition: Clark B.”

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BLAST FROM THE PAST: Halloween!

 

from www.essecavalheiro.blogspot.com
from http://www.essecavalheiro.blogspot.com

posted by Beret.

Hey. It’s almost Halloween! I’ll have a new post up ASAP, but I wanted to remind you all of a few fabulous ideas from the past:

Ghost Cake with Flaming Eyes!

©2013 Beret Olsen
©2013 Beret Olsen

Extreme Pumpkins!

This, and many other fascinating ideas at www.extremepumpkins.com
This, and many other fascinating ideas at http://www.extremepumpkins.com

Halloween books!

3b42f-froggy1

This Book is Like Whoa

“Now here is my secret. It is very simple. It is only with one’s heart that one can see clearly. What is essential is invisible to the eye.” –Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince. Cover art for Wonder (above) is by Tad Carpenter, image from http://campusmlk.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/wonder.jpeg

posted by Beret

R.J. Palacio’s novel appears to be written for eight- to twelve-year-olds, but is, in reality, a compelling and inspiring book for readers of most any age. I do realize that Gina mentioned this book in a post from a while back, but after reading it myself, I felt it deserved a devoted post all to itself.

Wonder is the story of August Pullman, a boy born with severe facial abnormalities. He has been homeschooled by his mother his whole life, but when he turns ten, his parents decide to enroll him in a private middle school in New York City. Imagine all of the fear and insecurity, the freaky social and physiological transitions occurring at that time of life, and then imagine having to weather them all with a face that triggers screaming and crying, shocked stares, rude comments, and double-takes. “I won’t describe what I look like,” August says. “Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.”

August emerges as an honest and straightforward narrator, explaining in unemotional terms what it is like to walk through the world as he does. He maintains a sense of humor through many of his struggles, as well as a remarkable tolerance and understanding for the way people relate to him. Usually.   Continue reading “This Book is Like Whoa”

Mr. Wuffles!

I took the photo, but obviously this  image credit--and the others in this post--goes to David Wiesner.
I took the photo, but obviously this image credit–and the others in this post–should go to David Wiesner.

posted by Beret Ages:  5-10+

Three-time Caldecott Medal winner David Wiesner has done it again. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, he is known for crafting wild tales of new worlds–using few words, if any–with enough detail and complexity to appeal to readers of all ages. Mr. Wuffles is no exception.

Brief Synopsis:

Mr. Wuffles is bored. Mr. Wuffles is cranky. Substandard toys line the halls, untouched, as he searches half-heartedly for something worthy of his attention.

But what’s this nestled amongst the fake mice, feathers, and string?

Continue reading “Mr. Wuffles!”

Maybe the Best Book Ever

posted by Gina

You guys. Seriously. This is the most amazing, fabulous, wonderful, crazy-pants-happy-making thing I have ever read. Or read recently. How has no one told me about this book? How did it take me almost ten months to find out about it??

Fear not, those of you who have also been in the dark, I bring you the joy, the wonder, the THIS-IS-SO-AMAZINGNG-NESS of …

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library

lemon

Continue reading “Maybe the Best Book Ever”

Book Review: The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

From iwalmartimages.com.
From iwalmartimages.com.

posted by Beret

Ages: 7 to 107

This book is miraculous indeed.

It is simply worded, beautifully illustrated, and hits like a sledgehammer.

Don’t be fooled by the flowery font on the cover, the sweet pencil sketches, or the gentle cadence of the first chapter. The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane is not a Hallmark commercial. It is not for the faint of heart. It is the sort of book which, when read aloud, makes your child look at you sideways and say, “Why does your voice sound tight and strange?”    Continue reading “Book Review: The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane”

Life After Harry Potter – Part Three

posted by Gina

Brace yourself, fantasy lovers – for this, the third post-Harry installment, I’m throwing a lot at you. Ready? Fabulous.

We’ve mentioned the majesty that is Jane Yolen before, so perhaps you’ve had a chance to explore the wonder that she has bestowed upon the world. If you haven’t come across Wizard’s Hall, however, now is the time.

Continue reading “Life After Harry Potter – Part Three”